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Women Play Catch-Up Their Entire Careers

Posted By Julie McReynolds, Wednesday, November 1, 2017

 

Women Play Catch-Up Their Entire Careers

Author: Vivian Blade

 

“Women get less access to the people and opportunities that advance their careers and are disadvantaged in many of their daily interactions.”

 LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company, 2016 Women in the Workplace Report


In my coaching practice, I run across a number of female professionals who are frustrated with their career progression. They feel like they are committed to the company, working endless hours and doing what it takes to get the job done. They feel like they’re pushing through this journey on their own.  In fact, it’s not just a feeling.  Studies on the progress of professional women show this to be true for so many.


The 2016 Women in the Workplace study by LeanIn.org and McKinsey also found that, “Women are less likely to receive the first critical promotion to management—so far fewer end up on the path to leadership—and are less likely to be hired into more senior positions. Women also get less access to the people, input, and opportunities that accelerate careers. As a result, the higher you look in companies, the fewer women you see.”


Women Are Missing Critical Relationships

Professional women are missing critical relationships, such as mentors, coaches, advocates and sponsors. These people help to enable success in their careers.  Why has this situation not improved? Companies don't realize or appreciate the importance of these relationships and don't provide a supporting environment for these relationships to occur. Women lack awareness that they need those important relationships, so they fail to seek them out.


Women also make a number of mistakes that suppress their progress. 


Mistake #1: You lack an awareness of the types of relationships that advance careers

Career success takes a team approach because of the complexity of the corporate environment, with formal and informal processes and networks, and an abundance of office politics. You need people in your network to help you navigate this environment. Allies as mentors and Advocates as sponsors are important relationships in your career. Each has a different role, and may come in and out of the career journey at different points in time. 



Mistake #2: You wait for HR or your boss to give you access to the people and opportunities that advance careers. 

A challenge for women is strategically building and leveraging the types of relationships that act as a support system throughout your career.  You wait for permission or wait to see if you’ll be selected for the official ‘mentoring program’. Stop waiting! You don’t need permission. You are accountable for your own career and for being prepared for each successive step you wish to achieve.  Take the initiative to seek and maintain meaningful relationships throughout your career. 


Ally as Mentor

Allies often are great resources as mentors. Work with mentors to understand the types of skills and experiences you’ll need, and to help you grow in those areas.  They also can help you understand how things really work in the office and help you avoid landmines in your career.  A mentor may be within or outside of your employer, and can be at any level – senior to you, a peer, or a subordinate.


Advocate as Sponsor

An Advocate, or sponsor, is an ambassador who can enable progression in your career by speaking up about your track record and the capabilities they see in your potential. You need to promote your value in order to grow awareness of you and your capabilities among decision makers who could be instrumental as sponsors. 


Mistake #3: You don't manage the mentoring relationship and fail to get the outcomes you need. 

A good mentoring experience doesn’t just happen without planning and care throughout the process. There are four stages of a mentoring relationship that define your progress:

 

  • Selecting

  • Engaging

  • Progressing

  • Closing

 

Each stage has its own set of objectives and tasks. 


Mentoring relationships often fail because of the mistakes in the very first stage, Selecting Your Mentor.


Women Select the Wrong Mentor

Selecting the wrong mentor can be a waste of everybody's time, as well as detrimental to your self-confidence and career progression. 


When I worked for Humana in the early stages of my career, I was fortunate enough to be part of the Management Intern Program.  Though that program came with a formal mentoring relationship, being matched with the right mentor was just as important as selecting my own mentors in other stages of my career. I learned that being thoughtful about and carefully outlining my needs was one of the most important first steps to a successful mentoring relationship.


Before selecting a mentor, know your development areas and the skills you need to build for your career path. Seek a mentor who is knowledgeable about the skills you need to enhance or roles you’re considering on your career path. Find someone who has common personal or professional interests and aligns with your expertise.


Influence Your Own Access

You’ll continue to be left behind until you step up to take more ownership in gaining access to important relationships and opportunities.  Take a deep breath, and make it a priority to take the first steps of learning more about these relationships and engaging with a mentor who can be instrumental in helping you Fuel Your Career Forward.




About the Author Vivian Blade

A professional speaker, author and talent management expert, Vivian works with the world's top companies to fuel incredible leadership, and with professionals to fuel incredible careers. Vivian is a prolific writer whose articles, featured in professional, industry, and business publications, and published books, “FuelForward”, and "Find Your Fit", a collaboration with the Association for Talent Development, have helped thousands of professionals succeed.


Tags:  Business  Career  leadership  management  MBA Women  Mentorship  NAWMBA  negotiate  women  WomeninBusiness  WomenMBA  WomenSupportingWomen 

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Why Negotiate?

Posted By Julie McReynolds, Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Updated: Friday, September 22, 2017

 

Why Negotiate?

By Megan Betterman

 

As women, we often take care of the needs of others ahead of our own. This narrative plays out in our careers and keeps us from asking for what we may want: more money, more responsibility, more flexibility and many other elements of our careers. 

On the money front, we fear many things:
 creating havoc in our relationship with our future or existing boss
 asking for more will not work and is useless to even try
 finding the words to ask in a rational, compelling manner

These fears are valid. On the flip side, there are compelling reasons we should consider asking for more. The first is the amount of money we stand to miss out on if we don't negotiate. I've seen figures cited from $500,000 up to $1,000,000 in lost earnings over the course of our careers. It reminds me of compound interest and the value of starting to save and invest early on in life. The same is true in our careers. A powerful way to think about this is a $5,000 raise in 2017 is not a one-time increase to your earnings. You'll be receiving the benefit of that additional $5,000 in 2018, 2019, 2020 and so on.


The second reason to negotiate is it's expected. A study conducted by salary.com found 84% of hiring managers expect candidates to negotiate. Most hiring managers leave wiggle room when they make an offer in order to have flexibility if a candidate does ask for more.


A third reason to consider negotiating is due to the wage gap in the US. This topic is getting quite a bit of press in the news based on our volatile political climate. Caucasian women earn 79% of what their their male counterparts earn, African-American women earn 65% and Hispanic women 54%. McKinsey & Company has released information stating it will take us 100 years to have parity between genders in C-level roles and 25 years for parity at the VP level.

These numbers make my jaw drop. As strong women with MBAs, it's incumbent on us to change this trend. I’m looking forward to sharing more on this topic at the National Association of Women MBAs annual conference on October 21. Lori Klinka and I will be partnering up on how to interview successfully and then ask for what you’re worth. For more information on this topic prior to the conference, visit my website.

About the Author

Megan Betterman is on a mission to train women on how to negotiate their compensation, earn their full value and advance their career goals. She recently founded a consulting business to bring this mission to life and offers group workshops along with individual training. Additionally, she leads a team of digital marketers at HealthPartners in Minneapolis, the largest consumer governed non-profit health care organization in the nation. Megan recently completed the MBA program at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota with a focus in marketing. She spends her free time traveling the world, perfecting paleo recipes, and teaching yoga along with meditation.

Register now to attend her session at the 2017 Conference and Career Fair!

Tags:  Career  job  jobs  MBA Women  NAWMBA  NAWMBA2017  negotiate  negotiation  womeninbuisness 

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Negotiate For What You Want!

Posted By Nadia Alhashimi, Monday, June 19, 2017

Negotiate For What You Want! 

By: Julie Kratz

Women that have a plan and ask for what they want have an 80% higher chance of career success.  Men are four times more likely to negotiate than women. Women are far more successful at negotiating on others’ behalves than their own.  Let’s change this narrative.  Let’s learn to ask for what we want successfully.

In the July webinar, you will learn how to negotiate for what you want by:

         1) Channeling your purpose and passion

         2) Opening from a place of positive intent

         3) Aligning your ask with your audience's wants

Channeling your purpose and passion

You have to know what you want to be able to successfully negotiate for it.  To do this, women must channel their why.  What is your purpose?  What is your passion?  What gets you excited?

For my own coaching business, I often channel my why - my daughters.  I know when I travel for speaking engagements that I am going to be away from them.  It is important that I ask for payment for my time to be away from them and feel good about it.  I negotiate based on my why – I negotiate for them.

What is your why?  Align your why with your objective for negotiation and you are far more likely to be successful and to feel confident and excited to ask for it.

Opening from a place of positive intent

Assume positive intent.  One of my favorite coaching mantras.  It is critical that we focus on our audience’s wants and needs, and are curious to learn their story.  They also have good intentions, just as we do.  Their perception of the situation is likely different.  Do your homework and know what their position is.  Arm yourself with information to support your objective and search for win-win opportunities to make the pie bigger for both of you by aligning your “why’s”.

Aligning your ask with your audience’s wants

When you learn your audience’s wants and needs, you place yourself in a position to be successful. Assuming they are also coming from a good place and knowing their objective creates a place for intentional communication.  This means opening with asking good open ended questions, active listening, pausing, and playing back what you heard.

How will you ask for what you want?  Join us July 20th to learn more and collaborate with a group of like-minded women to learn more and apply to a real-life scenario.

 Register here

Julie is a Certified Master Coach and Kelley MBA with experience in operations, marketing, and strategy in the manufacturing, financial services, and agriculture industries. Throughout her twelve years in corporate America, Julie has been recognized for excellence in facilitation, strategic thinking, and leadership. 

Julie is the author of the book, Pivot Point:  How to Build a Winning Career Game Plan.  Having experienced her own pivot point, Julie started her own coaching business, Pivot Point. Pivot Point exists to develop leaders and coach high potential women in career transition through building winning career game plans.  By nature, she is collaborative, and driven by measurable impact with her clients.  She is passionate about helping leaders and women with their “what’s next” moments in their career and leadership journeys.

Tags:  Leadership  negotiate  women  WomeninBusiness  WomenMBA 

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